Saturday, September 24, 2016

Our Wedding Engagement Newspaper


Happy Wedding Anniversary, Suzi!


As I do every year, I sit back on this special day and re-read the newspaper I created to propose back in March 2003. This full eight-page broadsheet is the one I spent about three months creating many months in advance.

It was quite the task, writing my own stories, editing and designing, selling ads to pay for the whole thing, and recruiting a roll of writers made up of family and friends. All of them keeping the upcoming marriage proposal a secret, of course!

I still remember staying out late at night, telling you they were late nights in my real paycheck-providing newsroom job when in fact they were spent at my old college newspaper stomping grounds putting this paper together.

It was tough, but it all paid off.

This is really a place to post the full newspaper, to keep it alive in digital form online. Sure, I have a couple dozen copies left over from the 1,000 created for that night and beyond. And every one of those eight pages has been framed to display in our home, to display for us to reflect on and for all those who might want to look at them.

Our newspaper hits the 21st century blogosphere, for the entire online universe to see as it may want to (likely clicking on the images themselves, to make them show up in readable sizes...)

The Daily News, Engagement Edition. Created for the proposal event on March 15, 2003.

Front Page

Page 2

Link to Front Page Proposal story. And the Page 2 jump.
Link to Speech story. And Page 2 jump.
How'd we catch each others' eye? Here's a Christmas 2002 account of those initial impressions...
Link to the Page 2 story on Sustaining Surprise.

Page 3

Inside Spread, Pages 4-5

Written by one of Mike's good friends from high school. (Click for bigger image)


Page 6
 Link to In the Beginning, a story of Us on Page 6.
Link to Page 6 story 9/11 emails between Mike and Suzi

Page 7
Back Page (The Ad Page)


Happy Anniversary, my love.

Our story continues, and I'm honored to have the chance to live it with you.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

An Aching Tooth and Diabetes Stigma

I sat silent there in the dental chair, listening to the new dentist ask an array of basic questions about dental history and overall health.

Of course, diabetes came up.

Earlier, in the waiting room, there were the new patient forms to fill out everything about me. All the health and medication issues, and that typical checkbox for "diabetes."

I checked that box, but wrote in "type 1" on the line almost by instinct. I questioned that even while writing it, because I wondered if it somehow implied I was saying, "Not Type 2, or that kind of diabetes..."

Was I fueling misconception? Was I feeding into the daunting cloud of diabetes stigma that exists in the world?

Deciding it was over-thinking, I ignored my concern and wrote it on the form. And then went about completing the rest of the paperwork before seeing this new dentist for the first time.

Nice enough lady, and I was eager to get to the meat and potatoes of why I was there in the dentist chair: Discomfort in a tooth that concerned me.

As the routine goes, she went through the paperwork quickly and read off some of the health and medical related points I'd filled out. That's where she came to my checked box about diabetes.

"Oh, and diabetes... type 1, so that means you've had it since you were a child and it's OK?"

Red flags went up in my brain, but I hesitated.

"Yes, I was diagnosed at age 5, but you can be diagnosed with type 1 at any age!"

"Type 2s are being diagnosed as children more commonly, too!"

"Why the hell would it be OK at any age?!?!"

"It's not really referred to as juvenile diabetes anymore, because most of us with T1D are adults and more are being diagnosed as adults."

"What are you implying about those diagnosed as adults, or those with type 2 or gestational... no one chooses diabetes!"

But, I didn't say any of that.

I recalled writing "Type 1 diabetes" on the form in the first place, and how I'd ignored my gut instincts to just leave it as "diabetes" because distinguishing the types didn't matter at this moment.

Yep, I had pretty much brought this on.

Then I also remembered: My tooth hurt.

And that's why I was there.

So, I politely agreed with her, confirming that I was diagnosed as a young kid at age 5.

And I didn't say anything. I chose not to advocate, for whatever it might be worth.

Now a week later, I feel guilty for not raising my voice and advocating to that Healthcare Provider when I had the chance. I may not see this dentist again for a variety of reasons, but that just means I lost the chance to clarify something about diabetes that she may not have understood.

Especially in light of the latest research from the big EASD conference in Germany, in which a study showed that half of those with T1D are older than 30 years old. It's not just a kid disease, and the use of the word "juvenile" is outdated and inaccurate in many cases.

All of that makes me feel more at fault for not raising my voice to educate this dentist, especially when these folks are on the front lines in healthcare and can actually diagnose diabetes and help keep an eye (or tooth?) on D-management.

By not speaking up, I am a part of the problem in maintaining the status quo that's so saturated with stigma and misconception.

The Diabetes Community has an aching tooth in how it self-identifies and responds to the public, and that stigma is not far off from being that painful tooth that's in need of a root canal.

In retrospect, my silence feels like I just flooded the tooth with ice cold water and am now feeling the painful sensation that comes from allowing someone to continue not knowing about diabetes.

No, I don't always have to advocate in these types of situations. But then, I can't be surprised when someone doesn't know how things really are about diabetes.

And my tooth still hurts.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Which Don To Respect?


Remember how I used to occasionally reference the "Don of Rage Bolusing?"

You know, that was mostly a term of endearment for my insulin pump. Even though sometimes, I used it to describe myself from time to time. In those times when I saw stubborn High blood sugars that wouldn't budget with normal correction doses, via my insulin pump.

So, I would click a couple pump buttons and dose a wave of insulin... a rage bolus, as it were (hat tip to Kerri). Since I liked to be silly and named my insulin pump "The Don," thanks to my love for the Godfather movies and TV Show NCIS where Mark Harmon plays the character Gibbs.

Yeah, it was all in good fun. A way keep my sanity while keeping up with this wondrously exciting life with diabetes jam-packed with device juggling, management tasks and mental gymnastics.

Well buh-bye, Don of Rage Bolusing.

I've been on a #PumpHiatus for the past four months. There was never a certain date, and as of now I'm not 100% sure if and when I might go back to my insulin pump. This Multiple Daily Injections (MDI) system using Novolog pens, Afrezza inhaled insulin, and a twice-a-day dose of long-acting basal is working fine for me.



With that, I've hung up my hat (at least temporarily) as the "Don of Rage Bolusing"...

Instead, it's now: 

"The Don of Rage Dosing" 

or maybe, too:

"The Don of Rage Inhaling"

(Hat Tip for my Type Awesome Spouse for noting this distinction.)

We'll see what happens next, and which Don ultimately wins out.

Either way, there must be respect.

In the meantime, I'm kissing the ring and trying to control the rage as much as possible. While respecting that fact that it's my diabetes calling the shots and "settling all family business" relating to my blood sugars, more than anything...